Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate effective written/verbal communications
  2. Develop strategies to solve problems and select an appropriate course of action; demonstrate critical thinking skills
  3. Translate theory into practice
  4. Incorporate knowledge of developmental states as a continuum in the design of appropriate programs and services
  5. Incorporate diverse teaching methods and strategies which are appropriate to addressing the needs of children and families
  6. Work effectively with diverse age groups
  7. Work effectively with families to nurture diverse lifestyles and cultural backgrounds, including language
  8. Develop and institute the tools to design culturally relevant programs and services
  9. Develop and institute anti–bias practices throughout every level of an organization
  10. Plan for and respond to issues of inclusion
  11. Adhere to professional, physical, mental health, safety, licensing, and accreditation standards related to the environment

Course Learning Objectives

CFS 110 Planning Age–Appropriate Activities/Environments

  • Conduct a needs assessment of an environment and develop a plan for improvement.
  • Demonstrate the development of skills of self–evaluation and reflection on work with children.
  • Incorporate appropriate culturally diverse art forms, literacy resources, age appropriate activities and community resources within the program.
  • Demonstrate the ability to implement anti–bias practices within the environment.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in applying theory to environments for children and families.
  • Support the value and acquisition of a first language and dialects in children and their families.
  • Work effectively and collaboratively with diverse families, staff, and community groups.
  • Adhere to professional, health, safety, and licensing standards related to the environment.

CFS 120 Physical and Intellectual Development

  • Understand how child development relates to classroom practices, children's self–concept, social development, and positive guidance.
  • Demonstrate the ability to have high expectations for every child in the classroom.
  • Understand the influence of culture on child development and demonstrate understanding through your work with children.
  • Support the value and acquisition of a first language and dialects in children and their families.
  • Reflect on and analyze your own skill, ability, and classroom practice.
  • Translate theory into practice.
  • Work collaboratively within diverse groups.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
  • Understand and apply age–appropriate guidance practices in programs and services.
  • Adhere to a professional code of ethics when using assessment tools or strategies.

CFS 130 Social and Emotional Development

  • Understand how child development relates to classroom practices, children's self–concept, social development, and positive guidance.
  • Develop and implement a personal philosophy of child guidance.
  • Reflect on and analyze your own skill, ability, and classroom practice.
  • Understand the influence of culture on child development and demonstrate understanding through your work with children.
  • Develop and implement a culturally relevant, anti–bias curriculum.
  • Translate theory into practice.
  • Apply professional principals in work with children and families.
  • Work effectively with families to nurture diverse lifestyles and cultural backgrounds.
  • Model personal and organizational codes of ethics in behavior and practices.

CFS 245 Building Partnerships with Diverse Families

  • Work effectively with families to nurture diverse lifestyles and cultural backgrounds.
  • Reinforce and validate the value of respecting cultural and individual diversity.
  • Demonstrate ways to validate the family's first language, cultural communication structure, and interaction styles.
  • Use knowledge about diverse family structures to provide appropriate services.
  • Examine your own biases toward variations in culture, language, and family styles.
  • Strategize to solve problems, select appropriate action, and manage/facilitate conflict resolution.
  • Develop and implement personal and professional goals and ethics.
  • Demonstrate ability to apply theories of culturally relevant anti-bias parent education in work with groups of parents.
  • Translate theory into practice.

CFS 280 Methods for Cultural Relevancy/Anti–Bias

  • Identify and locate themselves, their colleagues, and the families they serve within a multicultural, multiethnic community.
  • Describe (verbally and in writing) the historical and contemporary social and political factors that have influenced how issues of justice, equity and inclusion are experienced by their own ethno cultural group (cultural competence) and by other ethno cultural groups (intercultural competence).
  • Challenge western cultural notions of the foundations for scientific theory and application, locating instead critical mathematical and scientific discovery within the cultures of color where important theories originated.
  • Regard themselves and each other as valuable resources in the work to create effective culturally inclusive, responsive and democratic communities.
  • Identify other resources to support them in this work: community leaders and activists; institutions and agencies that are sensitive to diversity issues; culturally relevant organizations; funding sources, etc.
  • Recognize programs that disempower, disenfranchise, and marginalize the children and families they purport to serve, and understand the relationship between these outcomes and “isms” embedded in the philosophies and policies of the institutions or organization.
  • Students of color describe resistance work, as well as strategies for “rejecting rejection”. Dominant culture students describe anti-racist work as well as strategies for working collaboratively with oppressed people in “undoing the isms”.
  • Demonstrate the ability to think about and apply culturally relevant, anti–bias and multicultural principles and practices in a variety of settings, including programs that serve bilingual populations, at-risk families, families with special needs, non traditional families, etc., as well a s traditional programs that are culturally specific.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of programs they have implemented in terms of cultural relevance, anti–bias and multicultural praxis.

CFS 284 Literacy Development For Children And Their Families

  • Demonstrate knowledge of literacy development and the significance of literacy skills in a social and cultural context
  • Design and implement literacy services for children and families
  • Create an early childhood classroom environment that advances literacy development in ways that also promote the development of numeracy as well as science/discovery exploration.
  • Utilize knowledge of literacy and literacy development in the planning of services
  • Utilize knowledge of culturally relevancy and anti–bias practices in the planning of services
  • Plan for and respond to issues of inclusion.
  • Incorporate culturally diverse art, science and mathematical forms and community resources in literacy programming
  • Support the value and acquisition of a first language and dialects in children, youth and their families
  • Respect and facilitate the delivery of service in ones first language
  • Advocate to provide access to basic literacy resources for children and their families

Building Bridges Learning Objectives

Infant/Toddler Module I: Supporting Healthy Social and Emotional Development

Module I Description:
This class is one of a three–part series and is designed for caregivers working with children in the first 3 years life. Caregivers will explore attachment theory and its application and learn to support the social and emotional needs of infants and toddlers. Other topics discussed in this module are providing secure and safe environments and developing strong family/caregiver relationships. Earn college credit and STARS credit. Tuition and textbook are funded by a grant, so there is no cost to you. You must attend all 10 hours in a module to be eligible.

Module I Learning Objectives:

When participants have completed Module 1 they will be able to:

  • Identify attachment behaviors.
  • Discriminate between secure and insecure attachment behaviors.
  • Apply emotionally responsive care to facilitate infant–toddler attachment.
  • Describe social and emotional health for children birth to 3 years of age.
  • Identify infant/toddler states and cues.
  • Explain how routine caregiving practices support healthy social and emotional development.
  • Identify responsive social environments.
  • Describe characteristics of culturally responsive care.
  • Discuss how culturally continuity supports infant–toddler mental health.
  • Recognize milestones of social and emotional development including developmental red flags.
  • Building partnerships between caregivers and parents and families.
  • Foster social skills for children birth to 3 using responsive child guidance techniques.

Back to the Top