Seattle Culinary Academy

Culinary Arts Program Curriculum

1'st QuarterCr
CUL 101 FOOD THEORY I 6
Introduction to fundamentals of professional cooking. Includes history of food service industry, professional attributes, kitchen safety, sanitation, nutrition, equipment and ingredient identification, basic kitchen ratios, weights and measures, pre-preparation, knife skills, basic aromatic and flavoring combinations, and theory of moist and dry heat cooking, stocks and sauces, basic baking, and breakfast preparation.
CUL 111 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL COOKING: PRACTICUM 6
Hands-on introduction to professional cooking. Includes kitchen safety, knife skills, basic cooking preparations, sanitation/clean-up, stock preparation, meat/poultry/seafood fabrication, inventory, knife sharpening, omelette cooking and mock sauce preparation.
CUL 151 SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS PRACTICES I 1
Intro to the current ecological, economical and political issues relating to the food system. Raises awareness of issues of the food system from producer to consumer, exploring agriculture, fisheries, dairy, meat and poultry production, water and waste. Includes trade, health and social justice issues within the food system.
HOS 101 CUSTOMER SERVICE PRACTICUM I 1
Application of basic customer service theory in a full service restaurant or pastry case. Includes busing, housekeeping, mise en place for both casual and formal restaurant settings and customer service and sales techniques in bakery counter settings.
HOS 110 PRINCIPLES OF SANITATION 3
Fundamentals of food service sanitation and its importance to the industry. Includes microorganisms in food spoilage and food-borne illness, ways of limiting microbial contamination and growth, creating a clean and sanitary environment, accident prevention and first aid, Material Safety Data Sheets, sanitation in crisis situations, principles of designing safe and sanitary kitchens and government regulations.
MIC 102E MS EXCEL 1
2'nd QuarterCr
CUL 102 FOOD THEORY II 5
Continued introduction to professional cooking, particularly theory relating to quantity food production. Includes trade terminology, heavy equipment, tool identification, mise en place, soups, salads, meats, fish, vegetables, starches, hors d?oeuvres, garnishes, and presentation.
CUL 112 QUANTITY COOKING: PRACTIUM 8
Students will prepare a variety of meals suitable for volume feeding in a cafe-type setting. Recipes and cooking methods discussed in the classroom will be implemented under supervision of the chef instructor.
HOS 102 CUSTOMER SERVICE PRACTICUM II 1
Students refine customer service skills by further practice in a pastry case or full-service restaurant. Includes dining room arrangement, buffet setup and wait staff duties. In the bakery counter setting, students practice product rotation and merchandising.
HOS 111 INTRODUCTION TO CUSTOMER SERVICE:THEORY 1
Covers the theory and operation of table service in a variety of dining environments. Includes dining room safety, proper service and etiquette, guest interaction, menu knowledge and ticket writing. Use a variety of dining room equipment.
HOS 122 PURCHASING AND INVENTORY: THEORY 1
Intro to principles of food costing and inventory procedures. Encompasses formal and informal purchasing methods, flow of goods, food buying, legal and ethical purchasing considerations, market analysis, stock rotation, bid specifications, yield and cost comparisons, quality tests and inventory.
HOS 123 FOOD COSTING PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION 1
Explores connection between profit and food cost; discusses product waste and defines costing terms and purchasing units. Use mathematics skills to make conversions, cost bulk and sub-recipes and calculate the selling price of a menu item.
3'rd QuarterCr
BAK 105 RESTAURANT BAKING: THEORY 1.5
For culinary arts students. Expands on science and principles of baking, including yeast doughs and formulas, icing techniques, basic cake types and characteristics of desserts.
BAK 115 RESTAURANT BAKING: PRACTICUM 1
For culinary arts students. Production of baked goods including ganache, custards, creams, puddings, mousses and purees.
BIOL 103 NUTRITION FOR FOOD SERVICE PROFESSIONALS 3
Identification of known nutrients for human health; demonstration of dietary quality guidelines; utilization of dietary guidelines in meal planning, including modification of existing recipes to meet nutritional recommendations.
CUL 103 FOOD THEORY III 4
Restaurant-level professional cooking, particularly menu planning, ordering, and preparing/producing complete meals. Also includes culinary French, restaurant kitchen organization, fresh herb identification, exotic vegetable/starch identificaion, market fluctuations/trends, yield grades, plate presentation, cost control, purchasing, condiment production, menu writing, advanced cooking techniques, advanced fabrication, and recipe conversions, requisitions, and modifications.
CUL 113 RESTAURANT COOKING: PRACTICUM 8
Preparation of meals for on-campus restaurant, emphasizing creativity. Includes kitchen rotations, speed/organization emphasis, plate presentation, quality assessments, menu planning. French menus and terminology, innovative products, flexibility, teamwork, supervision, inventory, receiving, distribution, product evaluation, fabrication and preparation of complex soups, sauces, aiolis, dressings, sides and entrees from international and blended traditions.
CUL 152 SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS PRACTICES II 1
Continuation of CUL 151.
HOS 103 CUSTOMER SERVICE PRACTICUM III 1
Students acquire expertise in customer service by performing opening/closing procedures, displaying French, English and Russian table service, and training bus staff.
4'th QuarterCr
BAK 116 FINE DINING BAKING: PRACTICUM 1
For culinary arts students. Applies baking theory to production of yeast doughs (bread, puff pastry and choux), breads, focaccia, cakes, icings, decorations, mousses, tortes, puff pastries and fine plated desserts.
CUL 104 FOOD THEORY IV 6
Building on previous theory courses, this course emphasizes international fine dining cooking theory. Includes Italian, Japanese, Mediterranean and other international terminology; extensive nutritional discussion; menu feasibility studies; international ingredient identification; fine dining kitchen organization; international cooking methods; cooking method adaptations; written requisitions; garnitures; advanced plate presentation; advanced cooking methods; menu writing; and recipe studies.
CUL 114 INTERNATIONAL COOKING: PRACTICUM 8
Provides hands-on training in cooking and preparing meals for fine dining. Student will exhibit skills in the preparation and presentation of these dishes in a full-service restaurant. Leadership skills will be exercised.
HOS 104 CUSTOMER SERVICE PRACTICUM IV 1
Introduction to leadership positions in the dining room. Mastery of French service; exhibition of tableside food preparation and service in a fine dining setting. Encompasses maitre d?hotel duties, supervision of opening/closing, training of wait staff and kitchen liaison duties.
HOS 124 COMPUTERIZED MENU PLANNING 2
Learn various menu layouts and designs. Use proper menu language, word processing and Excel programs to create menus and cost recipes. Perform weight to volume conversions.
5'th QuarterCr
CUL 120 INTRODUCTION TO WINE 1
Covers the fundamentals of grape growing and winemaking, including table, sparkling and fortified wines. Includes sensory evaluation of classic grape varieties and their growing regions with emphasis on Washington state wines. Learn strategies for food and wine pairing.
CUL 153 SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS PRACTICES III 1
Explore issues relating to a sustainable food system: globalization, food politics, food security and social justice. Examine climate change as it relates to the food system, water and waste issues, heritage foods, and practical application of ideas in the kitchen. Learn to navigate and purchase from the local producer market.
CUL 205 ADVANCED CULINARY THEORY 1
Explore the technical aspects of designing menus and menu items for specific target populations with an emphasis on high-end fine dining. Learn to communicate ?main message points? to describe and promote new or existing dining concepts for public relations and promotional purposes.
CUL 215 ADVANCED CULINARY PRACTICES 4.5
Culminate culinary experience in 4 capstone projects. Create and serve own menus in private dining room; create meals with nutrition focus; practice advanced technique; and build culinary competition skills. Lead others while practicing professionalism and commitment to producing quality food.
HOS 108 DINING ROOM AND KITCHEN MANAGEMENT 4
Covers management and supervision and training practices within the hospitality and culinary arts industries. Includes tableside cooking and service for COD projects.
HOS 201 FUNCTIONS OF MANAGEMENT 2
Covers management and communication theories and practices within the culinary arts and baking industries. Includes current issues: intro to hospitality, Americans with Disabilities Act, sexual harassment and other legal and human resource issues. Covers communications skills, functions of management, beverage management and financial statement analysis and résumé writing.
6'th QuarterCr
CUL 251 BUFFET CATERING/GARDE MANGER/ICE CARVING:THEORY 4
Covers garde mange applications such as charcuterie, forcemeats, curing and smoking, and hors d?oeuvres. Learn to design an ice carving and show platter. Learn about produce farming, sustainability, and seed to plate food production while visiting Skagit Valley Farm.
CUL 255 BUFFET CATER/GARDE MANGER/ICE CARVING:PRACTICUM 8
Prepare food for a buffet setting, including salads, canapés, dim sum, sushi, hot entrees and breads. Operate a ?to go? sandwich program to develop marketing and packaging skills. Produce a variety of charcuterie items. Work on one ice carving and show platter for buffet presentation. When applicable, use weekly harvests from Skagit Valley Farm in menus and recipes.
PSYC 240 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN RELATIONS 3
Covers dynamics of organizations and human resources in the workplace: motivational theory, leadership, group processes, organizational theory, participatory management, conflict management and counseling. Primarily for professional-technical students.
Total Credits = 101